Holiday Nog Scones: eggnog scones that are gluten, dairy, egg, soy, and nut free

It’s probably no secret that scones are my favorite thing to bake. I still had leftover coconut milk holiday nog and wondered how this recipe might taste with that change.

These scones have an overall vanilla taste, with just the right amount of sweetness and hint of cinnamon and nutmeg- perfect for a holiday brunch. I served these at a girls’ get together and they were a hit!

So, here is the original scone recipe modified for the holidays:

Holiday Nog Scones (makes 14)

Ingredients:

  • 2 c. Gluten free flour blend (Bob’s Red Mill 1-1 in the blue bag)
  • 1 c. Sweet sorghum flour
  • 1 c. Brown rice flour
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt
  • 2 Tbs. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon
  • 1 c. Coconut cream (just the thick part off the top, allow a 12 oz can to sit undisturbed for a few days before opening the longer the better)
  • 1/2-3-4 c. Vanilla coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 c. Holiday nog

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 390 F.
  1. Grease two round pans – I used coconut oil.
  1. Add all ingredients to the bowl, then stir until just mixed. Note: The dough should be maleable and not too sticky. Add a bit of flour, if needed.
  1. Turn dough out on floured surface and “roll” until about 1- 1 1/2 inches thick. (I just pat it down instead of using a rolling pin.
  1. Using a floured 2-3 in. cookie cutter (or plastic cup), cut out the scones and place in baking dish.
  1. Brush tops of scones with holiday nog and sprinkle with sugar.

  • 7. Bake for 25-30 min, until the top is firm and slightly crunchy. Let cool 5-10 min in pan.
  • Make some coffee and enjoy!

    Tombstones, Life, and Ambitions: A New Year’s Post

    It’s not about the numbers chiseled in concrete, it’s how you lived your life in the dash between. — Scotty McCreery, The Dash

    Tombstones, life, and ambitions. This time of year, and this day in particular, people seem to think and act on these ideas more than usual.

    Tombstones 

    Anyone listening to the news or on social media could list numerous people who died this year.  Influential authors, singers, musicians, actors, politicians, theologians, missionaries. When news like this breaks, many are quick to bemoan the year — whether in jest or sincerity of hopelessness. “2016, what gives?” “Come on, 2016!” I haven’t spent the time to investigate the rumors of the GoFundMe set up to help Betty White survive 2016.

    As if a calendar year could control who lives or dies.

    I’m not trying to be insensitive.  On a personal note, this year death was — as always — very real in my life and the lives of my friends and family.  I went to more funerals than weddings this year. And there were even more that I was not able to attend.

    Maybe this year-end reflection needs a new angle. Taking another look at 2016, perhaps a year so full of death is also a merciful reminder that life must end one day, and there is no way to tell how many years that dash on the tombstone will cover. It’s a merciful reminder, because left on my own, I would not remember to look to the end.

    Life and Ambitions

    While cheerily waving this year away, we greet 2017 with hope.  Hope that life goes on. Hope that life gets better.  Hope that we could change someone else’s life for the better. We set new ambitions.  How will we get better? How will we improve? Where will we make our impact?

    What are your goals? I started setting mine this week and preparing to put them in practice (I won’t say what they are, but they might involve organization and simplicity… and the mortgage). For others who can be task oriented (like me… sometimes), the focus can be on do, do, do. The more I think about it, doing must go hand-and-hand with being.  As a result, with the new year approaching, I find a question growing more in my mind:

    What kind of people ought you to be? 2 Peter 3:11

    Just let that question ring into the silence and feel its impact.

    What kind of people ought you to be?

    Peter’s context here is the end of all time, not just 2016. Year-endings are a reminder of the greater ending to come, so this verse, to me, is also a poignant question for each New Year.

    This rhetorical question is quickly answered within the same verse:

    You ought to live holy and godly lives…

    This is not a call to live a kind life or a good life, but to live a life sacred to God, in piety, or reverence and duty, towards him.  This is εὐσέβεια (yoo-seb’-i-ah), which has promise of the life that now is, and of that which is to come (1 Timothy 4:8), and which has power inherent in it (2 Timothy 3:5).

    So, part of my prayer for the new year is that I have the ambition to lead a peaceful and quiet life in all godliness. That I trust that God has given me everything pertaining to life and godliness.  That I don’t lose sight of the call to be holy because my LORD God is holy. That I don’t forget that by abiding in Him I can bear the fruit of godliness, and much of it.

    In the words of Francis Chan,

    The world is not moved by love or actions that are of human creation. And the church is not empowered to live differently from any other gathering of people without the Holy Spirit. But when believers live in the power of the Spirit, the evidence in their lives is supernatural. The church cannot help but be different, and the world cannot help but notice.

    Happy New Year!

     

     

     

    New Year 2012: Will I begin with pride or humility?

    Like many others do this time of year, I have made resolutions that I fully intended to carry out.  At least until June.  (By then it should be habit, right?)  Often, I set out to conquer, determined to be strong.  The temptation and tendency to pride is pretty strong.  I will be better.  I will be skinnier.  I will be more disciplined.  I will read more books.  I will simplify.  I will. I will.  I will.

    This quickly turns in to “This is my will and I will do it on my own strength.”  Pride.

    The second aspect of celebrating the New Year is looking back on the “old” year.  That is a different and more beautiful story.  Maybe my plans worked out.  Maybe they didn’t.  But, it was God’s will and God’s plan that was always fulfilled.  And never once did I carry myself — not even in the happy times.  Looking back, I see my strength leave, and God’s grace restore from an unending supply.  I see many blessings that I didn’t know could even be had.  I see how God revealed more of His love and mercy to me.  I see Him break my will;  I see Him restore my joy.  Pride can’t look at that and live.  Humility can.

    My New Year’s prayer for myself is that my heart would not be so divided as to look on the past with humble amazement and the future with prideful ambition.  May I consider both with humility and “go out with joy and go forth in peace.”

    Happy New Year!  May you be blessed with much joy and confidence as you see God’s plan unfold in this next year!

    (P.S.  And please, please check out this post from the GirlTalk blog Sitting in the New Year.  This is an amazing post on how to approach New Year’s resolutions with a humble focus on God)