Reading Language Arts Anchor Charts

I have successfully spent the last morning of 2015 sniffing Sharpie fumes… I mean, making anchor charts for the classroom. Along with getting organized for the semester, I also wanted to create some reading and grammar resources for my kiddos to use in the classroom to help retain previously taught information. Anchor charts are a helpful visual aid for introducing a topic. Sometimes I bring a completed chart for the lesson. Other times I create a chart while I’m teaching the lesson and hang it up later. The students like to copy the chart in their notebook for note-taking if I’m making one during the lesson. We also discuss information that could be added to the anchor chart (or information that shouldn’t be added) during that lesson or as a review activity. During small groups, students can complete or create from scratch an anchor chart about the lesson, which I also display. (That’s evaluation, application, creation, and synthesizing, for those keeping track of higher order thinking skills.) I have seen my students use these to help answer questions and guide discussions in table groups. They have grown in confidence as a result. Over time they depend less on the chart as a result of repeated exposure to the information. Since I have ESL students, I tend to go for charts that are rich in vocabulary words, as well as grammar. Here are some of my favorites I made today. (But seriously, anchor chart crafting should be done in a well ventilated space. Sharpie-induced headache is a real thing.)

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Others include Pinterest inspirations:

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What are some anchor charts you use in your classroom?